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Thursday
Aug302012

Sponsors of Tomorrows Enterprise, Intel CIO Kim Stevenson - ITSM weekly the podcast EPISODE 94

Sponsors of Tomorrows Enterprise, Intel CIO Kim Stevenson

What happens when a CIO, a Service Desk Manager and an Industry Junkie Chat Weekly?!

Your Hosts:  Chris DancyMatthew Hooper and Matt Beran (twitter #ITSMWP)

Guest:  Kim Stevenson, CIO, Intel @Kimsstevenson

Submit Questions:  Anonymously or Email or Call In: (765) 236-6383 or Twitter Questions/Comments #ITSMWP

  **News Gator: Updates from Tech**

 Episode 94 Topics:

Things we want to talk about:

  • ·      The CIO
  • ·      Woman and Minorities and Tech
  • ·      Intel
  • ·      Social Media

Kelli Gizzi from Intel

The skills of the knowledge worker today have changed, MarTek, what do you see as the changing role for the IT Professional?

We are at another inflection point for CIOs and Tech.

“Marketing and IT are BFF’s “

“The speed and pace of business is changing, and it’s being LEAD by marketing.”

“Seriously where do you get a cloud architect today?”

Data Curators, very important to driving effective business decisions.

66% of grade school will be in jobs that don’t exist today.

The fear of professionally obsolesces, and the CIO’s advice.

“The theory of adjacency– Your next BEST job if the job adjacency to you.”

Will the depth of skills be changed by the theory of adjacency?

What about BYOD what are the views for BYOD from the CIO of Intel. 

BYOD in place for 2.5 years at Intel.

They have a HIGH level of trust in their employees.

30K employee owned devices on network that are managed and compliant. 

“Consumer services are better than TRADITIONAL IT SERVICES”

“IT will become OBSOLETE”

“Innovation is FUNDED BY THE POTENTIAL SIZE OF THE MARKET AND THE PROFITALBEITY OF THAT MAKRET……funding is going to consumers, not to businesses TODAY!”

Consumerization is going to be around for a while.

If you are in IT, YOU NEED TO UNDERSTAND consumers.

“Let’s call IT consumers NORMAL, who are trying to do a GREAT job for our company”

What type of advice can you give to professionals who are having trouble combining their professional and private life?

Is it even relevant to ask for a CV today?

We as IT professionals have to spend time EDUCATING people.

If you don’t exist on line, you are not very marketable.

Advice for CIO’s that are not sure about joining social media?

“Be aware and cautious, but don’t’ stop crossing the street”

  • ·      Shift your focus from the blogs to social feeds and you will be more efficient within a week.
  • ·      Don’t’ FOLLLOW 100’s of people, online.

First Olympics where every country participating, had a woman represented?

Should we still be talking about woman and minorities as if it’s “news”?

Equality is not always practiced in every part of the world; we can’t just get over it.

Woman in IT podcast series, CIO United Nations Show.

Advice for young woman who wish to be CXO’s.

How young people are fundamentally different today.

The notion of a permanent record doesn’t exist anymore.

Blog for Kim Stevenson at CIO of Intel

“The IT organization, HAS TO BE THE MODEL FOR THE ROLE OF RELEVANCY.”

Intel Bunnymen

Does the CEO of Intel, call you for help as if you were the Help Desk?

What does the CIO of Intel ask her support staff for?

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TRANSCRIPTION:

 

ITSM weekly the podcast for your news, insight analysis, and information from the world of IT Service Management. Your host, Matthew Hooper, Chris Anthony, and Matt Baron. IT Service Management weekly, the podcast, starts now. Welcome to ITSM Weekly the podcast episode #94, for the month of August, 2012. 

Hey, It's Chris Anthony and I am here with my host, Mr. Matt Baron. Hi Matt, how are you doing? Good, how are you doing Chris? I am weary and worn like a good saddle. Matt Hooper, you there? I am. Guys, I have some very exciting news for you. There is, you know how we always talk about CIOs, we always talk about marketing, we always talk about information technology and merging the social media and this transformation that is happening in the enterprise and all this amazing stuff and you know I'velove affair with women and leadership roles, you guys know all of these things, correct? 
Correct. I have on the show today Kim Stevenson, CIO of It's very exciting. Welcome Piere. Hi guys, how are you? Well Hooper sounds like he might not have any coffee. So I, the rest of us are good. Kim it's so exciting to have you on this show, we got a bunch of things we want to talk about, but I have to tell you I am a follower, I love your stuff and you, you just have a broad range of things that you tweet on, and I think, it's so refreshing to actually follow someone like you, and I want to tell you I am a big fan from the start but to get things started, we got a few sections, and we want to break things down and to make it easier, we've got a section on CIO ...section on, uh women and minorities and tack and how that works, some information on intel, because as I was telling Kelly in your organization.... don't, I think my life has been revolved around [xx] one way or another. 
And then social. So Kim, do you have a place you'd like to start? I am open, I mean we can start with the CIO role if you'd like. I actually happen to know a CIO/CMO type person on the phone. Mr. Matt Hooper, can you put it up and get us going here. You bet, it's a pleasure to talk to you Ken because these are topics that our listeners of many CIOs are eager to hear your response and your reaction to. 
So one of the questions that we wanted to throw out to you is the skills of the knowledge work today especially in IT have changed. You know, we're constantly seeing how the CIO also needs to be a [marketing] officer Bartek persona that has come about. We'd love to get your thoughts on what do you see as the changing role for the modern IT professional and on top of that where do you see that those people can go for their careers in the future? 
concept marketing coming in to that role. Yes, sir. Well, let me start with, you know I've been around IT, many different facets of it for way too many years, you know. I quit counting. When I got above 25, I quit counting. So, as a profession, this is a profession that changes dramatically every so often. 
Right, you know we were mainframe, we had, you know lots of me-print skills with the client server, and the internet came, and we're at another one of those inflection points. I say we've entered the new era of computing. And, In this era, right, it's a lot about business acumen, business process knowledge. 
So, when you talk about marketing and IT, I'd say that we're BFF's right? And because marketing possesses a ton of knowledge and information about what makes a good campaign, what are the right types of messaging, what customers you're trying to target, blah, blah, blah, blah. The whole hosted thing and IT possesses a bunch of knowledge about how do you deploy that, how do you support that in this infrastructure. 
We are at that point where we almost have to change. The response times in the past, if you ask for marketing campaign, they usually want it to go out tonight or tomorrow. They don't want to wait six weeks while we provision that application and this device. The speed and pace of business is changing, marketing is leading the way. 
They are showing what can be done across, you can apply it to all functions of business thought. When you look at skills then you say, Wow! I, one, have to build really strong business acumen. Always been true of IT, even more true today. It's a process, business process knowledge and the acumen of the strategy, the business strategy because we have to get more in the anticipation phase, and not the reactive phase of life. 
And, you know, things like cloud architects, you know it's my favorite thing, because we are doing internal private clouds. But seriously, like where do you go get cloud architect? Get out of college. Super Mario Brothers, version 3. 
Yeah, they don't exist. We're growing them, people are growing into the position. Data curators, right. These are things that are emerging and are very important to driving effective business decisions, effective business understanding and IT is behind that. So, I think there's a lot of emerging skill areas, new areas. 
If you're an IT professional, what better time to be here, right? We were doing some work around grade school students. If you're in grade school now, I think the number is 66% will land in jobs that don't exist today, by the time they enter the workforce. wow. Right, and I think that's very representative of IT, I just don't think it's grade-school kids, I think it's people that are currently employed will have to go through a change. 
I think that scares a lot of people too. I'm fortunate enough to speak at conferences and things, and I would say to people that one of the reasons I started trying to broaden my horizons in my own IT career was four years ago, I said to myself, does the skill set I possess today, will that support my salary and my aspirations in 2020? 
I'm 43 years old so that's 8 years away. The answer to that was no. It eally is a scary time. I mean if you just look at the changes 3 years ago 2009 to now and then think will we see exponential change between now and 2015, and these things are somewhat overwhelming, do you ever think about that sort of thing? 
So, I do, and people do tell me it is, it is scary. I don't know where to go and I don't want to be obsolete and those, those types of discussions I get into frequently, but my response is OK.... let's take a pause and look back. Are you doing today what you did when you started your career? Almost every single time the answer is well, no, and I say OK, how did you get from what you started doing to what you're doing today? 
People can pinpoint inflection points. I had this opportunity, how did that emerge? Well, I applied for this or I went and contacted this, and they typically have done something to initiate, and so when you can, when you can look back and see that you've actually been through many, many transitions in your career to develop and extend skills, then you began to get comfortable with the fact that you have to continue to develop and extend your skills. 
Now its only a matter of where do you extend them to? And I have this, I call it the Theory of Adjacency and by the way I made that up. alright, I won't put the link the [xx]. I'll just put, like, a picture of you. It is, it's, you know, your next best job is the job that is ...adjacent to your current job Um.
So a lot of people look up and they say oh I want my bosses job and I go really is that the only place you're looking, how 'bout... about sideways, how about, you know, in a three dimensional forward backward model. Because if you think about it, you posses some knowledge knowledge. Not enough to form that adjacent job perfectly, but posses enough to get started and if you are willing to grow and learn within a very short what certain amount of time you will perform that adjacent job likely better than the persons doing it today. 
Now we'll move forward two years ...the next adjacent job, well forward what's the next adjacent job, so I think that that's a very effective way to manage um careers and extend your skill.... that each and every time, you go through a transition. Whether that transition is initiated by you or initiated by things outside of your control. 
[xx] Right? Nice in quotes. 
Do you that that might have an adverse affect over time though with the depth of skills that we need to have, you know, particularly around science and technology? Excellent question, and our principal engineers are the ones who point that out to me every time I discuss my theory of adjacency. And I do think depth matters, breadth and depth are needed, and so this notion of, you know,constantly changing and extending is different when you're in a depth career, if you're gonna be a deeply technical person. 
But deeply technical, you cannot stay the same either, because your technology base moves forward and you have to move, they just move forward, their adjacency is a forward/backwards model versus a sideways or up/down model, right? So, it's the same but they move in a different way staying within a technical domain.
Yeah, I'm working, I'm working at McDonalds and I'm doing a burgerburger -line stuff, so instead of trying to go for manager, I go to burger king. Or you go to Fry's, where the big money's at. Speaking of Fry's, Kim we've been There just been a huge debate online, and it's not really a debate. And it's among est people who have no control over it. 
Cooper can you ask Kevin about... It's a touchy issue [xx] You talking about the bring your own device ? Yea, yea, that's so ugly. I don't even like to say the word. It's a four letter word. You seem very progressive in this where you seem to be embracing it as an organization if I can read your social ...you know intense?
Yeah we do have a very strong BYOD program its been in place 2 and a half years roughly... ...if you go you never go back, let me tell you that alright Nice, nice.
There was pent up demand and every company... You know, we have a high level of trust in our employees and our managers so it doesn't make it very bureaucratic for your manager says it's okay for you to bring a device in, we believe the manager. And we let that happen, so its not all really bureaucratic. 
And in two and a half years we have 30,000 employee owned devices on our network that you know comply and are managed in a way consistent with our security policies. And you know we have a, we only have a hundred thousand employees and a lot of those are in manufacturing and have no need for a device, so you can see its a high percentage of the population.
Yeah.
They're very happy with it, you know our strategy is really keep it in to the ultra mobile devices, phones, tablets, that kind of thing. The bigger story I think goes under device. Cause a lot of people talk about the device.
Kim by the way we don't Good.
You talking to people who, we actually focus on people who are bringing their own processes and building, bringing their own tools and bringing their own data stores and bringing their own infrastructure Right.
Bringing their own support, you're own the right pod cast if you wanna go crazy. I'm just letting you know. 
DNR teminology it's destiny, It's bring your own destiny. 
Yeah, see I call it consumerization and its the consumer services are better and traditional IP services. So, when you can go to an app store download a productivity app or you can do file sharing or you know, I could go on. You can do, you know, video calls and that isn't available from an enterprise you know IT will become obsolete. 
If you look at the economics of that environment, why does that happen? Why are there better tools available in the consumer market and to enterprise IT. The market share is higher. To me we've created a jobs program around the process of [xx] ...understanding what employees need.
Well yeah but, but if you look it would go even one further step back in the Eco system, innovation... is the funded by the potential size of the market and the profitabilty of that market, so what you are seeing is the start-up in the innovation month is going to the consumer market because it's enormous. 
It used to always go, if you go all the way back to mainframe. Um, innovation went to ...main frame applications why, it was the only thing available. the software...
Um hum.
...development services all went into that platform and as... the world has moved forward. The biggest, most attractive market for a software developer or services platform developer ....is the consumer market. So, is a bureau professional the ip serving up an enterprise. You gotta get your head around... 
that phenomenom is gonna be true for a while. So how do you leverage what is available in the consumer market to make your company better? 
But are we missing in your opportunities IT professional to us data folks. Okay we understand you can use whatever applications you want, as soon as you get to the data connection point that's where you and I have to talk but are we missing an opportunity as an IT profession to say "Gosh, 80% of our people are using Evernote." We don't officially support it. 
We need some sort of platform that has that functionality. Are we missing the value creation portion of IT by not looking and understanding why people are doing this. Yeah, I think so. That's where I'm trying to drive our organization is let's understand what the use models are. Let's not just assume it's bad, "Oh, Oh, those bad people. 
They downloaded applications". Let's call them normal, let's start with the premise that they're normal people trying to do a great job for our company and now let's figure why they need that, what's the use model and is that the best way to provide that capability to that group of users? A perfect example is something like Facebook or Twitter, right, so you got employees out there and we talked about this a couple episodes back about how you've got employees and recruits out there that are, that are on Facebook and on Twitter and, and what you're really buying is what they're creating. 
I mean, thats when you buy an employee, that's what you're buying there. I think a lot of people struggle with understanding that that is that is part of who you are and what you're getting. And I see a lot of IT professionals struggling with making their work life part of their online life and melding the two . 
Do you have advice for people who are having a hard time finding their voice and getting involved, avoiding the lurkers? I would rather people be lurkers than non-existent. So I guess that's a step in the right direction, right? And I've told people start by lurking. Just lurk. Look and see what's happening, but obviously participation is what actually makes experience rich and I bet everyone of us on this call, our profiles on linkedin are updated to represent the current state of whatever our professional resume looks like. 
And I would also bet and I don't even know you guys. I bet your paper CV is not up to date. No, it's not. What's that? As a matter of fact mine is so not up to datepapyrus . Right, so the question, you know, is that do you even start with when you interview somebody. Do you start with send me your resume or send me your CV? 
I guess you'd fax it, wouldn't you? Yeah. Chris is just says Google make? Remember those things that they stuck in the corner of an envelope, oh, postage stamps right? Yes. To me it is really exciting, its different times, different change. Part of it is we have to help educate, and I actually spend a fair a bit of time with people inside Intel and outside of Intel, helping them understand their own marketability is reflected about what people can find about you online. 
If you don't exist, you are not very marketable. So we meet a lot of people, conferences, we have a lot of people on the show. Actually, a bunch of us on the show are pretty transparent You know, from a CIO role, you have someone who's looking at your Twitter feed, you have someone who's looking at your LinkedIn feed. 
You have someone who might try to find you on Facebook. I've spent four years trying to live very openly, it's helped me understand all the social permissions systems. Do you have advice for other CIOs or anybody in the field who says I don't know if I really want to be on LinkedIn or, I mean, LinkedIn's kind of I would hope he would try that. 
But so many people go: I don't know how to start. 
Yeah, look I'm the first to say you, you must be aware and cautious. Look both ways before you cross the street is very good advice. But don't stop from going across the street, don't click on weird links. You know, malicious code is out there. Bad things can happen. I recently had a proposal from somebody, a marriage proposal online. 
You know, dating proposal, dating. So I had to go report the spam, you know, I just decided that that was probably not something that was going to. So you have to accept those things. They're not horrible. They're really not any different than, you know what might happen if you are at the mall, this happens online. 
Right. 
My advice to start is very practical, I believe that most professionals able to read industry press, business news, trade magazines, those kinds of things. The shift goes to Twitter. Follow your favorite news feeds and I believe within a week you will see that you are much more efficient and aware of what's goingand in your industry and your profession. 
Then take the next step. Follow a handful of people. Don't follow hundreds or thousands at first. Follow a handful of people that make a difference in your industry. Exactly. I always tell people that. They get on Twitter or Facebook or something and they friend and follow everybody, and I'm like, to me, you really, I mean, just follow very small, but watch. 
I mean, there's a reason that Jane Goodall didn't study all the gorillas. She just studied a small percentage. Alright? She just watched those few and they were enough for them to pick something out. You know, when you're filtering through the noise, Kim, we're one of the One of the things that we just have seen in the past couple of days is both sales force of this company called Clout so a bunch of these companies that are starting to say hey, there's so much noise, we're gonna rank people online and kind of give them scoring. 
Have you heard of this? Yeah, yeah. Yea, yea, it's like an E-Bay seller rating concept. I like that [xx] So, like you give good sell. I like that. it's interesting cause I think some people are using it to filter out noise or not filter out noise. To talk about, just to shift a little bit, off the technology, the Olympics just ended And one of the things I thought was really moving in the beginning of the Olympics was the commentator said this was the first Olympics [xx] every county participating had a female representative. 
Is it still appropriate to point out things like out or do we have an obligation to act like it's normal. Well, why would you make a big deal of it. I personally was moved, I thought it is a big deal. How do you feel about that? over it and stop looking for these moments and just treat everyone like they're automatically equal. 
It's a touchy topic for some people. Well, you know, I think this was a very special Olympics. And you know, it was the Olympics of the women athletes. Yes, it was. Every team, many, many records broken you know, more won by women than men, blah, blah, blah. So I think we can look around and say everyone should be treated equal and that's absolutely true. 
However, that isn't always practiced in every part of this world. So I don't think it's a time that we just get over it. It's a time when we celebrate progress and we've made progress. We need to make more progress. We had a series a few years ago with Women in IT. We were fortunate to have the CIO of the United Nations on. 
And she was very upfront about, she was also African, and she was very upfront talking about some of the struggles that she had been through in her career as she advanced from a uniquely perspective female role. So things she noticed that she thought maybe most people didn't know. Do you have any advice for young women who aspire to be in the C-Suite? 
Yes, I do. First of all, I would would always start from the point of encouragement. Right? I think encouraging young women or men just go the long way. But encourage them to follow their passion. Because if you are passionate about something, good outcomes happen. I also think that Being in inquisitive or curious is really important. 
The digital natives, that's what this generation is, right? Yep. Children that are in school today and our recent college graduates are all digital natives and so there's great experience, the 40s and 50's generation can share with the digital natives but they're going to invent things that we've never dreamed of. 
Inquisitive and curious don't lose that because that is really valuable. And then I think that the last point is creativity, experimentation. That risk taking is rewarded and I think that coming through experiments in a scientific method mentality you learn something from every experiment whether it's successful or it fails. 
Applying that learning is what will lead you to those great outcomes. So I would just continue to encourage them to experiment and be creative, dip your toe into areas you didn't think that you knew that much about and see what you can learn. 
Nice. 
I think with the younger generation, my kids are pretty much all teenagers at this point, I find that they have technical dexterity that is phenomenal. But, what they don't get is informational impact. They don't understand how sharing information or receiving information impacts not only their thought process but the reflection of others on them. 
Maybe that's just experience or life experience that has to come. But I I just know as myself as a teenager, there were things that I knew, and I could have called somebody or I could have wrote them a letter and told them. But I knew, I probably shouldn't tell somebody what my best fried just told me. 
For some reason they don't get that and they share it, they are so willing to share, and people will say because it is so easy but I'm not sure that's it. I think because its digital age like you said you don't get that emotional reaction, or their facial expression, you don't get those things that tell you that the human signals that say hey, you know, keep your mouth quiet, you know? 
Could they be adapting and learning new signals that we just aren't aware of? 
See that's what I think it is. I think we grew up with a notion of a permanent record. There was a permanent record that he did something bad right? And I think that our kids have grown up with the idea of immediacy, everything happens immediate, and once it's over its over, you just move on. And so if you've posted some bad picture on Facebook, well you know what, in two days its old news so and no will ever know about it again.
You had tiger blood,and now it's over.
We know, technically, there's a permanent record, but they don't think about it that way because there isn't an immediacy.
Well, from an intention point of view, there is no permanent record, right? It's not really the technology that makes the record permanent. It's the attention -- which is kind of a whole 'nother podcast. One last question because I know we've got to let you go. The C-Suite -- you're involved, you're out on Twitter, you're blogging. 
By the way, great picture of you on the blog. Even I would propose to you, but that would be awkward for a lot of reasons.Look , I think that it is a point of relevance. How do you stay relevant to your customers, to your employee base, to keep the company moving forward. I think that the IT organization has to be the role model for relevance and I intend to be that and I intend to pull many IT professional forward with me but it is about staying relevant for the benefit of our company to succeed in the future. 
And that's what's so amazing because Intel is so relevant. I can't imagine a world without Intel. My entire professional career was built on Intel. I joked around when I was talking to R Kelley, I said I almost wanted to do this podcast in a bunny suit, because I've been using your Intel products for so long and to hear you say that it's important to be relevant not only to your customers, but you said, your employees. 
And that's just so transformational, and so wonderful. I want to tell you, it's been such a highlight for me to have you on the show today I know how extremely busy you are in everything that you're doing, and it means a lot to me. Thank you so much. 
I have one last question for you [xx]. Oh, you stick in that, stays on. Come on Hooper, don't do this.
 It's something that I hear, I'm a member of SIM [sp] so I have many fellow CIOs and it's just interesting to hear this perspective and I just want to see also happens to you. Have you gotten the call from your CEO about a technical issue as if you were the help desk?
 
Actually my CEO is fabulous. He is vocal when he as a problem but he uses, I have an executive support team , and his first call goes to the executive support team. There are two people on this campus where my CEO sits, one of them is always available. And he calls them first, and he will let me know, they let me know too, by the way, usually first, but no, he doesn't, uh call. 
He will call me if he thinks that the IP build is somehow inhibiting the performance of the Intel processor. And we had many discussions around that, but it isn't the IT bill, or it is the IT bill [xx] and here's why encryption is so important, and blah blah blah but, no he uses my executive support team who is absolutely Fabulous, it has a great relationship with the entire senior executive team. 
That's great, that's good. Hooper [sp?] okay, I bet that was a funny question because I would do that, I I always ask the nurse all the questions, and then treat the doctor like the person who just writes the script. Well it's just funny because, you know I've spoken to the C.I.O [sp?] of [xx] insurance and all the major Boston companies around here and we'll just sit there and laugh with each other about how it happens in you know, smaller companies I've worked in, and big companies they've worked in, it's just interesting. 
Yeah. It will be more interesting if you ask my engineering team what I call them about on my problems. But that's probably another time half past 2.There you go. OK guys. Uh, we will see everybody in 2 weeks. Kim thank you so much for being brave, for being a leader, for really getting out socializing and changing not only the face of Intel but changing the face of technology and technology leaders. 
You truly are inspirational to so many.
Thank you.
Thank you so much, Kim for being on today.
Take care, bye bye. OK everybody, we will see you in two weeks.
This was ITSM Weekly. Thank you for listening. For more information about this podcast, thats the ITFM news go to ITFM weekly dot com. 
ITSM weekly the podcast for your news, insight analysis, and information from the world of IT Service Management. Your host, Matthew Hooper, Chris Anthony, and Matt Baron. IT Service Management weekly, the podcast, starts now. Welcome to ITSM Weekly the podcast episode #94, for the month of August, 2012. 
Hey, It's Chris Anthony and I am here with my host, Mr. Matt Baron. Hi Matt, how are you doing? Good, how are you doing Chris? I am weary and worn like a good saddle. Matt Hooper, you there? I am. Guys, I have some very exciting news for you. There is, you know how we always talk about CIOs, we always talk about marketing, we always talk about information technology and merging the social media and this transformation that is happening in the enterprise and all this amazing stuff and you know I'velove affair with women and leadership roles, you guys know all of these things, correct? 
Correct. I have on the show today Kim Stevenson, CIO of It's very exciting. Welcome Piere. Hi guys, how are you? Well Hooper sounds like he might not have any coffee. So I, the rest of us are good. Kim it's so exciting to have you on this show, we got a bunch of things we want to talk about, but I have to tell you I am a follower, I love your stuff and you, you just have a broad range of things that you tweet on, and I think, it's so refreshing to actually follow someone like you, and I want to tell you I am a big fan from the start but to get things started, we got a few sections, and we want to break things down and to make it easier, we've got a section on CIO ...section on, uh women and minorities and tack and how that works, some information on intel, because as I was telling Kelly in your organization.... don't, I think my life has been revolved around [xx] one way or another. 
And then social. So Kim, do you have a place you'd like to start? I am open, I mean we can start with the CIO role if you'd like. I actually happen to know a CIO/CMO type person on the phone. Mr. Matt Hooper, can you put it up and get us going here. You bet, it's a pleasure to talk to you Ken because these are topics that our listeners of many CIOs are eager to hear your response and your reaction to. 
So one of the questions that we wanted to throw out to you is the skills of the knowledge work today especially in IT have changed. You know, we're constantly seeing how the CIO also needs to be a [marketing] officer Bartek persona that has come about. We'd love to get your thoughts on what do you see as the changing role for the modern IT professional and on top of that where do you see that those people can go for their careers in the future? 
concept marketing coming in to that role. Yes, sir. Well, let me start with, you know I've been around IT, many different facets of it for way too many years, you know. I quit counting. When I got above 25, I quit counting. So, as a profession, this is a profession that changes dramatically every so often. 
Right, you know we were mainframe, we had, you know lots of me-print skills with the client server, and the internet came, and we're at another one of those inflection points. I say we've entered the new era of computing. And, In this era, right, it's a lot about business acumen, business process knowledge. 
So, when you talk about marketing and IT, I'd say that we're BFF's right? And because marketing possesses a ton of knowledge and information about what makes a good campaign, what are the right types of messaging, what customers you're trying to target, blah, blah, blah, blah. The whole hosted thing and IT possesses a bunch of knowledge about how do you deploy that, how do you support that in this infrastructure. 
We are at that point where we almost have to change. The response times in the past, if you ask for marketing campaign, they usually want it to go out tonight or tomorrow. They don't want to wait six weeks while we provision that application and this device. The speed and pace of business is changing, marketing is leading the way. 
They are showing what can be done across, you can apply it to all functions of business thought. When you look at skills then you say, Wow! I, one, have to build really strong business acumen. Always been true of IT, even more true today. It's a process, business process knowledge and the acumen of the strategy, the business strategy because we have to get more in the anticipation phase, and not the reactive phase of life. 
And, you know, things like cloud architects, you know it's my favorite thing, because we are doing internal private clouds. But seriously, like where do you go get cloud architect? Get out of college. Super Mario Brothers, version 3. 
Yeah, they don't exist. We're growing them, people are growing into the position. Data curators, right. These are things that are emerging and are very important to driving effective business decisions, effective business understanding and IT is behind that. So, I think there's a lot of emerging skill areas, new areas. 
If you're an IT professional, what better time to be here, right? We were doing some work around grade school students. If you're in grade school now, I think the number is 66% will land in jobs that don't exist today, by the time they enter the workforce. wow. Right, and I think that's very representative of IT, I just don't think it's grade-school kids, I think it's people that are currently employed will have to go through a change. 
I think that scares a lot of people too. I'm fortunate enough to speak at conferences and things, and I would say to people that one of the reasons I started trying to broaden my horizons in my own IT career was four years ago, I said to myself, does the skill set I possess today, will that support my salary and my aspirations in 2020? 
I'm 43 years old so that's 8 years away. The answer to that was no. It eally is a scary time. I mean if you just look at the changes 3 years ago 2009 to now and then think will we see exponential change between now and 2015, and these things are somewhat overwhelming, do you ever think about that sort of thing? 
So, I do, and people do tell me it is, it is scary. I don't know where to go and I don't want to be obsolete and those, those types of discussions I get into frequently, but my response is OK.... let's take a pause and look back. Are you doing today what you did when you started your career? Almost every single time the answer is well, no, and I say OK, how did you get from what you started doing to what you're doing today? 
People can pinpoint inflection points. I had this opportunity, how did that emerge? Well, I applied for this or I went and contacted this, and they typically have done something to initiate, and so when you can, when you can look back and see that you've actually been through many, many transitions in your career to develop and extend skills, then you began to get comfortable with the fact that you have to continue to develop and extend your skills. 
Now its only a matter of where do you extend them to? And I have this, I call it the Theory of Adjacency and by the way I made that up. alright, I won't put the link the [xx]. I'll just put, like, a picture of you. It is, it's, you know, your next best job is the job that is ...adjacent to your current job Um.
So a lot of people look up and they say oh I want my bosses job and I go really is that the only place you're looking, how 'bout... about sideways, how about, you know, in a three dimensional forward backward model. Because if you think about it, you posses some knowledge knowledge. Not enough to form that adjacent job perfectly, but posses enough to get started and if you are willing to grow and learn within a very short what certain amount of time you will perform that adjacent job likely better than the persons doing it today. 
Now we'll move forward two years ...the next adjacent job, well forward what's the next adjacent job, so I think that that's a very effective way to manage um careers and extend your skill.... that each and every time, you go through a transition. Whether that transition is initiated by you or initiated by things outside of your control. 
[xx] Right? Nice in quotes. 
Do you that that might have an adverse affect over time though with the depth of skills that we need to have, you know, particularly around science and technology? Excellent question, and our principal engineers are the ones who point that out to me every time I discuss my theory of adjacency. And I do think depth matters, breadth and depth are needed, and so this notion of, you know,constantly changing and extending is different when you're in a depth career, if you're gonna be a deeply technical person. 
But deeply technical, you cannot stay the same either, because your technology base moves forward and you have to move, they just move forward, their adjacency is a forward/backwards model versus a sideways or up/down model, right? So, it's the same but they move in a different way staying within a technical domain.
Yeah, I'm working, I'm working at McDonalds and I'm doing a burgerburger -line stuff, so instead of trying to go for manager, I go to burger king. Or you go to Fry's, where the big money's at. Speaking of Fry's, Kim we've been There just been a huge debate online, and it's not really a debate. And it's among est people who have no control over it. 
Cooper can you ask Kevin about... It's a touchy issue [xx] You talking about the bring your own device ? Yea, yea, that's so ugly. I don't even like to say the word. It's a four letter word. You seem very progressive in this where you seem to be embracing it as an organization if I can read your social ...you know intense?
Yeah we do have a very strong BYOD program its been in place 2 and a half years roughly... ...if you go you never go back, let me tell you that alright Nice, nice.
There was pent up demand and every company... You know, we have a high level of trust in our employees and our managers so it doesn't make it very bureaucratic for your manager says it's okay for you to bring a device in, we believe the manager. And we let that happen, so its not all really bureaucratic. 
And in two and a half years we have 30,000 employee owned devices on our network that you know comply and are managed in a way consistent with our security policies. And you know we have a, we only have a hundred thousand employees and a lot of those are in manufacturing and have no need for a device, so you can see its a high percentage of the population.
Yeah.
They're very happy with it, you know our strategy is really keep it in to the ultra mobile devices, phones, tablets, that kind of thing. The bigger story I think goes under device. Cause a lot of people talk about the device.
Kim by the way we don't Good.
You talking to people who, we actually focus on people who are bringing their own processes and building, bringing their own tools and bringing their own data stores and bringing their own infrastructure Right.
Bringing their own support, you're own the right pod cast if you wanna go crazy. I'm just letting you know. 
DNR teminology it's destiny, It's bring your own destiny. 
Yeah, see I call it consumerization and its the consumer services are better and traditional IP services. So, when you can go to an app store download a productivity app or you can do file sharing or you know, I could go on. You can do, you know, video calls and that isn't available from an enterprise you know IT will become obsolete. 
If you look at the economics of that environment, why does that happen? Why are there better tools available in the consumer market and to enterprise IT. The market share is higher. To me we've created a jobs program around the process of [xx] ...understanding what employees need.
Well yeah but, but if you look it would go even one further step back in the Eco system, innovation... is the funded by the potential size of the market and the profitabilty of that market, so what you are seeing is the start-up in the innovation month is going to the consumer market because it's enormous. 
It used to always go, if you go all the way back to mainframe. Um, innovation went to ...main frame applications why, it was the only thing available. the software...
Um hum.
...development services all went into that platform and as... the world has moved forward. The biggest, most attractive market for a software developer or services platform developer ....is the consumer market. So, is a bureau professional the ip serving up an enterprise. You gotta get your head around... 
that phenomenom is gonna be true for a while. So how do you leverage what is available in the consumer market to make your company better? 
But are we missing in your opportunities IT professional to us data folks. Okay we understand you can use whatever applications you want, as soon as you get to the data connection point that's where you and I have to talk but are we missing an opportunity as an IT profession to say "Gosh, 80% of our people are using Evernote." We don't officially support it. 
We need some sort of platform that has that functionality. Are we missing the value creation portion of IT by not looking and understanding why people are doing this. Yeah, I think so. That's where I'm trying to drive our organization is let's understand what the use models are. Let's not just assume it's bad, "Oh, Oh, those bad people. 
They downloaded applications". Let's call them normal, let's start with the premise that they're normal people trying to do a great job for our company and now let's figure why they need that, what's the use model and is that the best way to provide that capability to that group of users? A perfect example is something like Facebook or Twitter, right, so you got employees out there and we talked about this a couple episodes back about how you've got employees and recruits out there that are, that are on Facebook and on Twitter and, and what you're really buying is what they're creating. 
I mean, thats when you buy an employee, that's what you're buying there. I think a lot of people struggle with understanding that that is that is part of who you are and what you're getting. And I see a lot of IT professionals struggling with making their work life part of their online life and melding the two . 
Do you have advice for people who are having a hard time finding their voice and getting involved, avoiding the lurkers? I would rather people be lurkers than non-existent. So I guess that's a step in the right direction, right? And I've told people start by lurking. Just lurk. Look and see what's happening, but obviously participation is what actually makes experience rich and I bet everyone of us on this call, our profiles on linkedin are updated to represent the current state of whatever our professional resume looks like. 
And I would also bet and I don't even know you guys. I bet your paper CV is not up to date. No, it's not. What's that? As a matter of fact mine is so not up to datepapyrus . Right, so the question, you know, is that do you even start with when you interview somebody. Do you start with send me your resume or send me your CV? 
I guess you'd fax it, wouldn't you? Yeah. Chris is just says Google make? Remember those things that they stuck in the corner of an envelope, oh, postage stamps right? Yes. To me it is really exciting, its different times, different change. Part of it is we have to help educate, and I actually spend a fair a bit of time with people inside Intel and outside of Intel, helping them understand their own marketability is reflected about what people can find about you online. 
If you don't exist, you are not very marketable. So we meet a lot of people, conferences, we have a lot of people on the show. Actually, a bunch of us on the show are pretty transparent You know, from a CIO role, you have someone who's looking at your Twitter feed, you have someone who's looking at your LinkedIn feed. 
You have someone who might try to find you on Facebook. I've spent four years trying to live very openly, it's helped me understand all the social permissions systems. Do you have advice for other CIOs or anybody in the field who says I don't know if I really want to be on LinkedIn or, I mean, LinkedIn's kind of I would hope he would try that. 
But so many people go: I don't know how to start. 
Yeah, look I'm the first to say you, you must be aware and cautious. Look both ways before you cross the street is very good advice. But don't stop from going across the street, don't click on weird links. You know, malicious code is out there. Bad things can happen. I recently had a proposal from somebody, a marriage proposal online. 
You know, dating proposal, dating. So I had to go report the spam, you know, I just decided that that was probably not something that was going to. So you have to accept those things. They're not horrible. They're really not any different than, you know what might happen if you are at the mall, this happens online. 
Right. 
My advice to start is very practical, I believe that most professionals able to read industry press, business news, trade magazines, those kinds of things. The shift goes to Twitter. Follow your favorite news feeds and I believe within a week you will see that you are much more efficient and aware of what's goingand in your industry and your profession. 
Then take the next step. Follow a handful of people. Don't follow hundreds or thousands at first. Follow a handful of people that make a difference in your industry. Exactly. I always tell people that. They get on Twitter or Facebook or something and they friend and follow everybody, and I'm like, to me, you really, I mean, just follow very small, but watch. 
I mean, there's a reason that Jane Goodall didn't study all the gorillas. She just studied a small percentage. Alright? She just watched those few and they were enough for them to pick something out. You know, when you're filtering through the noise, Kim, we're one of the One of the things that we just have seen in the past couple of days is both sales force of this company called Clout so a bunch of these companies that are starting to say hey, there's so much noise, we're gonna rank people online and kind of give them scoring. 
Have you heard of this? Yeah, yeah. Yea, yea, it's like an E-Bay seller rating concept. I like that [xx] So, like you give good sell. I like that. it's interesting cause I think some people are using it to filter out noise or not filter out noise. To talk about, just to shift a little bit, off the technology, the Olympics just ended And one of the things I thought was really moving in the beginning of the Olympics was the commentator said this was the first Olympics [xx] every county participating had a female representative. 
Is it still appropriate to point out things like out or do we have an obligation to act like it's normal. Well, why would you make a big deal of it. I personally was moved, I thought it is a big deal. How do you feel about that? over it and stop looking for these moments and just treat everyone like they're automatically equal. 
It's a touchy topic for some people. Well, you know, I think this was a very special Olympics. And you know, it was the Olympics of the women athletes. Yes, it was. Every team, many, many records broken you know, more won by women than men, blah, blah, blah. So I think we can look around and say everyone should be treated equal and that's absolutely true. 
However, that isn't always practiced in every part of this world. So I don't think it's a time that we just get over it. It's a time when we celebrate progress and we've made progress. We need to make more progress. We had a series a few years ago with Women in IT. We were fortunate to have the CIO of the United Nations on. 
And she was very upfront about, she was also African, and she was very upfront talking about some of the struggles that she had been through in her career as she advanced from a uniquely perspective female role. So things she noticed that she thought maybe most people didn't know. Do you have any advice for young women who aspire to be in the C-Suite? 
Yes, I do. First of all, I would would always start from the point of encouragement. Right? I think encouraging young women or men just go the long way. But encourage them to follow their passion. Because if you are passionate about something, good outcomes happen. I also think that Being in inquisitive or curious is really important. 
The digital natives, that's what this generation is, right? Yep. Children that are in school today and our recent college graduates are all digital natives and so there's great experience, the 40s and 50's generation can share with the digital natives but they're going to invent things that we've never dreamed of. 
Inquisitive and curious don't lose that because that is really valuable. And then I think that the last point is creativity, experimentation. That risk taking is rewarded and I think that coming through experiments in a scientific method mentality you learn something from every experiment whether it's successful or it fails. 
Applying that learning is what will lead you to those great outcomes. So I would just continue to encourage them to experiment and be creative, dip your toe into areas you didn't think that you knew that much about and see what you can learn. 
Nice. 
I think with the younger generation, my kids are pretty much all teenagers at this point, I find that they have technical dexterity that is phenomenal. But, what they don't get is informational impact. They don't understand how sharing information or receiving information impacts not only their thought process but the reflection of others on them. 
Maybe that's just experience or life experience that has to come. But I I just know as myself as a teenager, there were things that I knew, and I could have called somebody or I could have wrote them a letter and told them. But I knew, I probably shouldn't tell somebody what my best fried just told me. 
For some reason they don't get that and they share it, they are so willing to share, and people will say because it is so easy but I'm not sure that's it. I think because its digital age like you said you don't get that emotional reaction, or their facial expression, you don't get those things that tell you that the human signals that say hey, you know, keep your mouth quiet, you know? 
Could they be adapting and learning new signals that we just aren't aware of? 
See that's what I think it is. I think we grew up with a notion of a permanent record. There was a permanent record that he did something bad right? And I think that our kids have grown up with the idea of immediacy, everything happens immediate, and once it's over its over, you just move on. And so if you've posted some bad picture on Facebook, well you know what, in two days its old news so and no will ever know about it again.
You had tiger blood,and now it's over.
We know, technically, there's a permanent record, but they don't think about it that way because there isn't an immediacy.
Well, from an intention point of view, there is no permanent record, right? It's not really the technology that makes the record permanent. It's the attention -- which is kind of a whole 'nother podcast. One last question because I know we've got to let you go. The C-Suite -- you're involved, you're out on Twitter, you're blogging. 
By the way, great picture of you on the blog. Even I would propose to you, but that would be awkward for a lot of reasons.Look , I think that it is a point of relevance. How do you stay relevant to your customers, to your employee base, to keep the company moving forward. I think that the IT organization has to be the role model for relevance and I intend to be that and I intend to pull many IT professional forward with me but it is about staying relevant for the benefit of our company to succeed in the future. 
And that's what's so amazing because Intel is so relevant. I can't imagine a world without Intel. My entire professional career was built on Intel. I joked around when I was talking to R Kelley, I said I almost wanted to do this podcast in a bunny suit, because I've been using your Intel products for so long and to hear you say that it's important to be relevant not only to your customers, but you said, your employees. 
And that's just so transformational, and so wonderful. I want to tell you, it's been such a highlight for me to have you on the show today I know how extremely busy you are in everything that you're doing, and it means a lot to me. Thank you so much. 
I have one last question for you [xx]. Oh, you stick in that, stays on. Come on Hooper, don't do this. It's something that I hear, I'm a member of SIM [sp] so I have many fellow CIOs and it's just interesting to hear this perspective and I just want to see also happens to you. Have you gotten the call from your CEO about a technical issue as if you were the help desk? 
Actually my CEO is fabulous. He is vocal when he as a problem but he uses, I have an executive support team , and his first call goes to the executive support team. There are two people on this campus where my CEO sits, one of them is always available. And he calls them first, and he will let me know, they let me know too, by the way, usually first, but no, he doesn't, uh call. 
He will call me if he thinks that the IP build is somehow inhibiting the performance of the Intel processor. And we had many discussions around that, but it isn't the IT bill, or it is the IT bill [xx] and here's why encryption is so important, and blah blah blah but, no he uses my executive support team who is absolutely Fabulous, it has a great relationship with the entire senior executive team. 
That's great, that's good. Hooper [sp?] okay, I bet that was a funny question because I would do that, I I always ask the nurse all the questions, and then treat the doctor like the person who just writes the script. Well it's just funny because, you know I've spoken to the C.I.O [sp?] of [xx] insurance and all the major Boston companies around here and we'll just sit there and laugh with each other about how it happens in you know, smaller companies I've worked in, and big companies they've worked in, it's just interesting. 
Yeah. It will be more interesting if you ask my engineering team what I call them about on my problems. But that's probably another time half past 2.There you go. OK guys. Uh, we will see everybody in 2 weeks. Kim thank you so much for being brave, for being a leader, for really getting out socializing and changing not only the face of Intel but changing the face of technology and technology leaders. 
You truly are inspirational to so many.
Thank you.
Thank you so much, Kim for being on today.
Take care, bye bye. OK everybody, we will see you in two weeks.
This was ITSM Weekly. Thank you for listening. For more information about this podcast, thats the ITFM news go to ITFM weekly dot com. 

 

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by Chris Dancy